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eNCL FAQ's

everything you need to know about the switch!

Nurse Licensure Compact Changes FAQs

What is going on with the Nurse Licensure Compact?

In a nutshell, the original Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC) is evolving to the new and improved Enhanced Nurse Licensure Compact (eNLC). This will mean some changes regarding which states are included.    

 

When is the eNLC happening? 

The new compact, known as Enhanced Nurses Licensure Compact (eNLC), was enacted on July 20, 2017, but, more importantly for you, the implementation or “go live” date for eNLC going into effect is midnight on January 19, 2018.

 

What about the original compact (NLC)?

All states that passed legislation to be a part of the new compact (eNLC) will join it and be active effective January 19, 2018.

All states that did not pass legislation, but are current (old NLC) compact members, stay a compact amongst themselves. Currently, these states are: Colorado, New Mexico, and Rhode Island.

 

Which new states joined the new compact (eNLC)?

Wyoming, Oklahoma, West Virginia, Georgia, and Florida.

 

Which states have pending legislation they hope to pass before January 19, 2018?

Massachusetts, New Jersey, and Michigan — these states are not yet part of the eNLC, but hope to pass their legislation before January 19, 2018.

 

What does all of this mean for Travel Nurses?

1. If you are in a state that is a current member of the NLC and has passed legislation to be a part of the new eNLC AND received your multi-state license before July 20, 2017, then you do not need to take any action.

Exception to the above: If you obtained your perm state compact license on or after July 20, 2017, you will be required to meet the new eNLC requirements. Each of the states which were part of NLC and will also be part of eNLC should be sending info on how to stay compact and if they will be offering a grace period to become compliant. Timeframes for this may vary by state. 

2. If you are in a state that was not part of the original NLC but will be part of the new eNLC, you will be required to meet the new eNLC requirements.  Each of these states (new to the eNLC: WY, OK, WV, GA, and FL) should be sending out info on how to become compact.

3. If you are in a state that is a current member of the NLC and has not passed legislation to be a part of the new eNLC, then you will lose multistate privileges to all states except Colorado, New Mexico, and Rhode Island. You will need to obtain a single state license to travel in any other state besides those four. Some states do not have a process set up for this yet. Keep contacting them!

4.  If you are in a state that has passed legislation and will be a part of the new eNLC, then you will no longer have privileges in Colorado, New Mexico, and Rhode Island. You will need to obtain a single state license to travel in these states. Again, these states are working on processes to make it possible to get a single state license if you carry a new eNLC multistate license.

Click here for a full list of eNLC implementation FAQs and refer to this map for updates on states passing legislation and becoming a part of the eNLC.

Please contact your Career Consultant or the Medical Solutions Clinical Team with any questions! 

“While on a road trip recommended by one of our patients, my fiance and I went on a hot air balloon ride in Winter Park, Colorado. While it was cold, the experience was totally worth it.”
-erica m

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